..........................

Sunday, 28 September 2014

The Radio Edition - September 28, 2014 *PODCAST*


Tune in Sunday night at 7 pm on 101.5 UMFM for West End Dumplings - The Radio Edition. Below are links to some of the people and events I will mention on the show. When it's all done, check HERE for the podcast ! 

Guest

Dr. Jody Perrun of the University of Winnipeg will launch his book The Patriotic Consensus: Unity, Morale, and the Second World War in Winnipeg on Thursday, October 2nd at McNally Robinson. We'll talk about what it was like here in Winnipeg during WWII.

Also, we will talk about last week's announcement that the remains of four Canadian soldiers from World War I have been identified.

St. Peters Old Stone Church
History Links

Here are just a few of the events that will be commemorated next week in Manitoba history. For more, be sure to check out This Was Manitoba each morning !

- The 150th anniversary of the death of Chief Peguis, (also.)
- The arrival of "Spanish" influenza in Manitoba
- The unveiling of the Little Black Devils monument
- The Royal Manitoba Theatre Centre opens
- The opening of Memorial Park across from the Legislature
- Rudyard Kipling's speech to the Canadian Club of Winnipeg

The Play List

We'll Meet Again by Dame Vera Lynn, (the U.K.'s oldest top 20 artist !)

Universal Soldier by Buffy Saint-Marie

Somewhere Over the Rainbow by Judy Garland. (The Wizard of Oz debuted in Winnipeg on September 21, 1939 - 75 years ago - at the Capitol Theatre !)

Goldfinger (James Bond Theme) - Dame Shirley Bassey, (released 50 years ago !)

Citizen Kane Suite by Bernard Herrmann

http://www.umfm.com/events/pledge/
UMFM's Pledge-o-Rama is coming up ! There will be great giveaways for pledgers and we're working on a history-themed walking tour for those who pledge through our show, (more details later !) For more info about why we do this event or to get your pledge in early.

Friday, 26 September 2014

Behind The Photo - Dominion Curling Champions 1928

Often I will see an old photo or ad and spend some time digging into the back story. Sometimes I find a great story, sometimes not. Either way, I learn a few things about the city's history. Here's my latest attempt:


This photo, from the March 3, 1928 Winnipeg Tribune shows Gordon Hudson's rink after winning the Dominion Championship. It marked the first time that the Brier Tankard came west of Ontario. From left to right are Bill Grant, Ron Singbusch, Sam Penwarden and skip Gordon Hudson.

Hudson repeated the feat in 1929, with Don Rollo in place of Sam Penwarden. It wasn't until 1957 - 58 that another team won back-to-back Briers, and not until Don Duguid in 1970 - 71 did a Manitoba team do it.

July 11, 1959, Winnipeg Free Press

Off the ice, Hudson was a partner in the candy manufacturing firm McBride Cannem and Hudson on Ross Avenue. He died at his Garfield Street home on July 10, 1959 at the age of 65. He left behind wife Flora and two grown children.

Hudson and his 1928 and 1929 teams are in the Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame.

Monday, 22 September 2014

Manitoba's WWI Fallen: Robert Bradshaw of Winnipeg

To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the start of the First World War, I am working on a series of blog posts and radio shows that will look at 100 Manitobans who died in action. For more about this project and links to other posts, follow this link.


Belfast-born Robert Oliver Bradshaw was a carpenter by trade. He first appears in the Henderson Directory in 1911 as a turnkey at Headingley Gaol. In 1912 he was a guard, married wife Ellen, and they bought a house at 532 Simcoe Street.

Bradshaw had been a member of the militia for 12 years with the "Scots Guard", its unclear if that was here or in the U.K.. He enlisted with the 28th Battalion on April 3rd 1915. When he left for overseas his family, which now included an infant and a newborn, downsized to the Hollywood Apartments, (now 552 Sherbrook Street.)

He enlisted as a Private but was quickly promoted to Sergeant for his bravery on the battlefield after digging out a number of men buried in an explosion. According to his wife, he was recommended for a medal of bravery, but a clerical error saw it awarded to someone else, (see article below.)

August 25, 1916, Winnipeg Free Press

Bradshaw wrote to his wife just a few weeks before he was killed at St. Eloi, reassuring her: “Don’t worry. Fritz is not going to get me”, (Fritz was a nickname for German soldiers.)  He was killed in action on August 11, 1916 at the age of 36 and is buried in the Reninghelst New Military Cemetery in Belgium.

At the time of his death, his children were aged three and 16 months. Depending on how soon he shipped out after enlisting, there is a possibility that he never met his second child.

Sources:
Attestation Papers
Canadian Virtual War Memorial entry
Canadian Great War Project entry
Commonwealth War Graves entry
Circumstances of Death entry
Photo is from August 23, 1916, Winnipeg Tribune

August 25, 1916, Winnipeg Free Press

This soldier's history has been pieced together using a number of sources. If you have additional information or would like to point out a factual error, please do so in the comments below or by email at cassidy-at-mts.net.



© Christian Cassidy 2014

Friday, 19 September 2014

In search of Winnipeg's "Ghost Signs" !

Old Sign
Old Sign
If you look up high and in the back lanes of downtown Winnipeg you'll see hundreds of "ghost signs". Each year, their numbers grow fewer due to demolitions, new paint jobs or graffiti.

Matt Cohen is leading a walking on Saturday to capture photographs of as these many signs as possible. Once collected, the history of the company, building or product will be researched and they will be plotted on a map. 

Join in an see a part of Winnipeg's history that you may not have noticed before !

Related
Check out my Flickr album of ghost signs !
Here's a Global News story about the project

Thursday, 18 September 2014

Manitoba's WWI Fallen: Richard Siberry of Winnipeg

To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the start of the First World War, I am working on a series of blog posts and radio shows that will look at 100 Manitobans who died in action. For more about this project and links to other posts, follow this link.


Richard Siberry was born in Knockcroghery, Roscommon, Ireland in 1894 and came to Canada when he was around 20 years old. He first appears in the 1914 Henderson Directory residing at 615 Notre Dame Avenue and working as a clerk at Eaton's. The following year he moved to a house at 533 Toronto Street with a group of about five other young men, two of them were also Eaton's clerks.

Siberry at right (courtesy: S. McMaster)

In March 1914 Siberry joined the Queens Own Cameron Highlanders militia. When war was declared he accompanied them to Valcartier, Quebec where they joined three other regiments to become the 16th Battalion (Canadian Scottish). They were part of the first wave of Canadians to leave for Europe starting on September 30th, 1914. (Siberry was aboard the S. S. Andaina which sailed on October 3, 2014.)

One account notes that he was promoted to Lance Corporal in December 1914 and his entry in the Book of Remembrance reflects this. Other records indicate that he was still a Private at the time of his death.

Top: June 9, 1915, Winnipeg Free Press
Middle: July 2, 1915, Winnipeg Tribune
Bottom: August 4, 1915, Winnipeg Tribune

For friends here in Winnipeg and family back in Ireland, the last weeks of Siberry's life were agonizing to follow. He appeared frequently in the war office's daily "casualty list" in June and July 1915. It prompted the Winnipeg Tribune to note:

“No Winnipegger has figured more prominently in the casualty lists than private Richard Siberry…. Time and again, more than a dozen times in fact, he has been reported as missing, wounded, prisoner of war, killed in action, then dead of wounds.”

Through all of his appearances on the official list, Siberry had already been dead for weeks. He received a gunshot wound to the leg on May 5, 1915 and was taken prisoner. He died the following day and was buried by the Germans. His final resting place is Larch Wood (Railway Cutting) Cemetery in Belgium.

Eaton's War Panels
Eaton's War memorial plates
Eaton's Roll of Honour, MTS Centre, Winnipeg

Siberry was one of 3,327 Eaton's employees that enlisted for military service, (1,101 from the Winnipeg store.) Of these, 238 were killed in action or died of wounds, 470 were wounded, and 41 were taken prisoners of war. He is commemorated on the Eaton's Roll of Honour tablets in Toronto and Winnipeg, the Soldiers' Relatives Memorial in Winnipeg and the Scottish National War Memorial.

Sources:
Canadian Virtual War Memorial entry
Attestation Papers
Circumstance of Death Record
Commonwealth War Graves Commission entry
Additional information and photo in uniform courtesy of Siberry's family in Scotland.

This soldier's history has been pieced together using a number of sources. If you have additional information or would like to point out a factual error, please do so in the comments below or by email at cassidy-at-mts.net.

© Christian Cassidy 2014

Wednesday, 17 September 2014

Burnell Street's Thelmo Mansions turns 100 !

Thelmo Manisons, 519 Burnell
It's had some ups and downs in recent years but the 78-suite Thelmo Mansions at 519 Burnell Street has been completely renovated and open again. This month it turns 100.

For a look back at its colourful history, check out my latest Winnipeg Downtown Places post.